Don't have a cow, man!


Ready to go dairy free? You may have an intolerance, have been told to eliminate dairy, or just want to try to have less of it.

Did you know that dairy free products go beyond milk substitutes? Now you can have dairy free cheese, pudding and even ice cream!


And you can easily find them in the grocery store. But read your labels! Some contain way too much sugar, or other ingredients you may not want to eat or drink. Be a detective at the grocery store.

Don't know what you are looking at? I am available to give you a tour of the aisles and help you choose the best products. Contact me for more information.

DIY

I've put together some simple recipes for you to make delicious dairy-free foods right in your kitchen. Go ahead and try my dairy substitutes.

Dairy-free milk

Dairy-free milk is so easy to make and flavor yourself. You can make milk out of just about any nut or seed. You can even make alternative milk out of grains like rice, oats, or quinoa. And you can flavor them too.

  • It just takes a high-powered blender, some water, and cheesecloth to filter out any remaining bits.

  • For flavoring, you can add a pinch of cinnamon, cardamom, or vanilla extract. You can also sweeten your milk with soaked dates, maple syrup, or honey.

  • To make a super-simple dairy-free milk just soak ½ cup of almonds, coconut, or even hemp seeds for a few hours (if you have the time). Soaking is optional, but it makes the blending process easier and the final milk creamier. Then drain the soaking water, rinse, and add to a blender with 2 cups of fresh water. Blend on high until smooth (about 1 minute). Add your flavorings, if desired. Then strain through a nut milk bag, fine mesh strainer, or a few layers of cheesecloth.

  • If you want to make a dairy-free cream, just blend your nuts, seeds and/or grains with 1 cup of water instead of 2 for a thicker, creamier, dairy-free milk.

Dairy-free yogurt

Technically, with the right yogurt starter probiotic culture, you can make yogurt out of any dairy-free milk. The most common one to ferment into yogurt is coconut milk. But you can use almond milk or other nut or seed milk.

The trick here is with the fermentation. Follow the instructions on the label of the yogurt starter culture, and enjoy delicious dairy-free yogurt in a few days.